Page 11234..1020..»

Three Tips to Help You Avoid Hitchhiking Bed Bugs From a Hotel … – Lifehacker

Posted: February 28, 2017 at 7:52 am

Bed bugs are crafty little things. Not only will they make even a nice hotel room their home, but theyll cling to your clothes and climb in your bag to go home with you. These tips can help you avoid such unwanted guests.

This video from the Consumer Reports YouTube channel shares some great advice on checking your hotel room for the nasty little critters (most of which weve talked about before.) But the video also offers some additional tips you may or may no know about:

If you take the time to do a proper check and follow this advice, you should be able to travel bed bug free.

How to Check for Bed Bugs in a Hotel Room | YouTube

Continued here:
Three Tips to Help You Avoid Hitchhiking Bed Bugs From a Hotel … – Lifehacker

Posted in Bed Bugs | Comments Off on Three Tips to Help You Avoid Hitchhiking Bed Bugs From a Hotel … – Lifehacker

Caretaker charged after elderly Pennsylvania woman dies from bed bugs – New York Daily News

Posted: at 7:52 am

Yks1E;[Mm9#dMb@K.+%^IWHJ:/u3|?iF)Z0Q*loc|M`3j&]QB5|G|>38 oSU9-s’$’G8bS*K”l*H0BOhp_Ja/{‘~5 8 zw3~d:0+moqrisG]4NQUijd 9ik$YRW+AGy4|-F 2p xz@6QHslVr13QT}&LZX?.2’5{gO(Tg~c7 (Fz+Qr”1biJL|:VbW-q {x0aWJ QFP$|ztF;._ :xMtQw9$8A+gVtc?? }rr9Yqtvqq7r*AweTX3`~Ki%s70=G tL{;’J/Nwnl)NMYb3tAoWFA 6JD|]>,O*A/h5″1pE*b>vF0 ki!m-?qFj35VVXn&.,+pQ|r5_/,_}8Fi?X1>Op~:(dH_VpQ'([szdpH65n~#$ L![^*-:0v sJG+4:i !mbx, !VO XVohZ%T %CR*ALVPwpRp)Cy@o r3 0#]Vn|6@vUx :OlSi;xWK4tz@MjejpsC34g#gFz=~=h`96 BX5BP0~fvQAuP%r PSd{“Uo[zs)iEE*_/ZO_3_j/irS7″Wu_A[hbimXWClo3T=I3PS-o GL -]W2zW2THRTWPEy)5L[r)C5_zj0:m D7$gN3Ta**1k,eKgw#F@#HO2Y;cd$QTeq5U )de*M:U+;rjx )DedW!@QGr( ,Kh2S/U/3jgt&G;hlnn

Posted in Bed Bugs | Comments Off on Caretaker charged after elderly Pennsylvania woman dies from bed bugs – New York Daily News

BMHA Papers Show Bed Bug Problem | WGRZ.com – WGRZ.com

Posted: at 7:52 am

Steve Brown, WGRZ 8:54 PM. EST February 27, 2017

BUFFALO, N.Y. — One of the oldest public housing projects in the country is Kenfield-Langfield in Buffalo. The sprawling property has one quarter of all of the public housing units managed by the Buffalo Municipal Housing Authority.

It also has the largest number of bed bug complains from residents.

The bed bugs are so bad children and people are getting bitten on their face. Theyre in their clothes. They dont have room to hidebecause there’s so many of them, says Neal Mack, a long-time resident at Kenfield-Langfield.

Mack’s assessment confirms what 2 On-Your-Side found sifting through 1,300 pages of internal documents obtained from BMHA in a Freedom of Information request.

The documents included 801 work orders submitted by public housing tenants asking for help in getting rid of bed bugs in their homes. The papers represent a 22-month period from January 2016 through October 2016. That means during that time period, BMHA got on average a new bed bug complaint every day.

I dont know if I can classify it as the biggest challenge that we have in public housing, says Modesto Candelario, assistant executive director at BMHA.

Candelario points out the agency manages and maintains almost 5,000 units of housing at almost three-dozen projects scattered across the city.

We have a $40-million operating budget. Were spending probably a $100-thousand a year, on average, on bedbugs,” says Candelario.

2 On-Your-Side analysis of agency documents shows over half of all BMHAbed bug complaints are concentrated at four properties.

Residents at Shafer Village filed 65 bed bug work orders during the 22-month span. Ferry Grider Apartments saw 69-work orders turned in. The Commodore Perry Extension, which is across the street from BMHA headquarters, had 80 bed bug work orders. But the most bed bug related work orders, by far, came from Kenfield-Langfield with 224 requests for bed bug remediation.

011817 Bmha Bed Bug Breakdown by WGRZ-TV on Scribd

This is a problem throughout the city, throughout the country,” notes Candelario.

Exterminators and entomologists agree. Bed bugs have found their way into all types of buildings including movie theaters, high-end hotels and country clubs. The blood-sucking parasites do not discriminate.

But one factor as to why the insects are a continuing problem in Buffalo’s public housing is second-hand household goods.

“Used furniture is a big, big issue, says Candelario.

Because public housing residents have little money, a hand-me-down mattress or sofa may be all they can afford. And there have been instances where furnishings removed from a bed bug infested home have been grabbed off the curb by unsuspecting public housing residents, bringing bed bugs home with them.

Were not going to tell them dont because what would be their options in some cases?, asks Candelario.

There is one option for struggling families, the Main Street thrift store run by the Society of St. Vincent DePaul.

More often not the reason theyre call us is they had to get rid of the furniture they have because it has been infested, says Mark Zirnheld, CEO of the organization.

Every donated item is screened at least three time for bed bugs before its added to their inventory. And Zirnheld says 85% of the clothing, furniture and bedding offered at the store is free.

But what about eliminating bed bugs from apartments at BMHA? Who does that job.

A thick stack of invoices for bed bug extermination shows just one company: Bugs & More.

A profile of the company on the Better Business Bureau website lists the owner at Eric Clear of Farnham. Information also indicates Clear started the business in January of 2014 and landed the pest control contract at BMHA the very next year.

Clear declined to speak with 2 On-Your-Side saying his attorney advised him not to.

Candelariodescribed Bugs & More’s work as adequate, “I think they do a decent job. I think they eradicate the problem almost every time we engage em.

But Neal Mack says BMHA doesn’t even hear about every bed bug sighting, because people have lost faith in the agency’s ability to fix the problem.

Some people they just get tired of reporting them. So, theyve been just handling it by themselves because they know (maintenance staff) is not going to come out.

( 2017 WGRZ)

More:
BMHA Papers Show Bed Bug Problem | WGRZ.com – WGRZ.com

Posted in Bed Bugs | Comments Off on BMHA Papers Show Bed Bug Problem | WGRZ.com – WGRZ.com

Bed bugs kill 96-year-old woman – WND.com

Posted: at 7:52 am

(EVENINGSUN) Last February, West Manheim Township Police entered a home on Baltimore Pike and one of the first things they noticed were the bed bugs.

The pests were seen on walls and along ledges. They scurried on the bed sheets and pillow where an elderly woman slept in a first floor room. That woman, police said, told officers she was blind, but could feel them crawling.

Sometimes, she said, the bugs bit her, too.

Read the original here:
Bed bugs kill 96-year-old woman – WND.com

Posted in Bed Bugs | Comments Off on Bed bugs kill 96-year-old woman – WND.com

Bedbugs kill woman, caretaker faces charges | khou.com – KHOU.com

Posted: February 27, 2017 at 12:45 pm

Gordon Rago, York (Pa.) Daily Record , KHOU 1:51 PM. CST February 26, 2017

West Manheim Township Police say a 96-year-old woman died as a result of “complications of sepsis following a bed bug infestation” at this home on Baltimore Pike, seen on Saturday, Feb. 25, 2017. (Photo: Lindsey Welling/ The Evening Sun)

A Pennsylvania woman died last year from bedbug bite complications. The insects had invaded the care facility where she was housed.

Now, the woman’s 72-year-old caretaker Deborah Butler faces felony charges including involuntary manslaughter and neglect of care.

Last February, West Manheim Township Police entered the southern Pennsylvania home and noticed the bed bugs. They crawled on walls and along ledges. They scurried on the bed sheets and pillow where an elderly woman slept in a first-floor room. She told officers she was blind, but could “feel them crawling.” Sometimes, she added, they bit her, too.

Paramedics, police said, would later check on that woman, but did not notice any visible injuries. Police said another woman, 96-year-old Mary Stoner, was staying at the home. Two weeks after the visit, Stoner was dead.

An autopsy determined her cause of death was from “complications of sepsis followed by bed bug infestation,” according to charging documents.

Stoner’s family moved her out of Butler’s home on Feb. 3, 2016, after noticing her health worsen. During previous visits, Stoner’s family told police she was in good health. On Feb. 6, Stoner was brought to the emergency room, where doctors found sores on her skin. Staff members were under the opinion the woman’s infection was a result of bed bug bites.

Stoner was discharged from the hospital about a week later, only to be readmitted again. Doctors said she had pneumonia.

She died a week later.

The women, police said, stayed with Butler at her home. Butler provided food, shelter, clothing as well as personal and health care. Both women paid for the care services, documents state.

In talking with police prior to Stoner’s death, Butler told them she had been trying to get rid of the bed bugs since September 2015 and had used store-bought supplies. She said she could not afford an exterminator and blamed Stoner for bringing in the bugs, documents state.

Butler, who was charged last week, had taken Stoner to her family doctor in January because Stoner had been scratching her neck and been sick. Butler did not mention bed bugs during the doctor’s appointment, police said, and Stoner didn’t mention them either.

In the coming weeks, Butler said she noticed no change in Stoner’s condition. But police said “evidence later indicated that the victim’s condition would have been clearly visible and obvious that serious medical attention was required.”

Stoner received no further medical treatment until her family took her to York Hospital. In the week after Stoner’s death, police said they searched Butler’s home and found bed bugs in various stages of their life cycle.

York (Pa.) Daily Record

Read the original here:
Bedbugs kill woman, caretaker faces charges | khou.com – KHOU.com

Posted in Bed Bugs | Comments Off on Bedbugs kill woman, caretaker faces charges | khou.com – KHOU.com

Caretaker Charged in Woman’s Bedbug Death – Newser – Newser

Posted: February 26, 2017 at 8:51 pm

(Newser) A truly horrifying story out of Hanover, Pa., where a 96-year-old woman died last February due to complications from sepsis that arose after a bed bug infestation. Mary Stoner’s caretaker, Deborah Butler, has now been charged in Stoner’s death, the Evening Sun reports. Butler, 72, once ran a licensed home care facility; when she shut it down, Stoner and another elderly woman started living with Butler at Butler’s own home and paying Butler as their caretaker. Stoner’s family noticed her health declining on Feb. 3, 2016, and moved her out of Butler’s home; three days later, they brought her to the ER, where she was found to have sores on her skin, a bad rash covering about half of her body, and a skin infection that doctors determined was caused by bed bug bites. She was discharged a week later, readmitted with pneumonia, and ultimately died Feb. 22, 2016, the York Dispatch reports. She had been in Butler’s care for more than 10 years.

When police visited Butler’s home, they saw bed bugs on walls, ledges, bed sheets, and pillows; the other elderly resident of the home told officers she was blind but could “feel them crawling” and biting her, and police saw bed bugs crawling on Butler’s then-48-year-old sister, who has developmental disabilities and also lived in the home. Butler told police she blamed Stoner for bringing in the bugs, and said she had been using store-bought supplies to try and get rid of them since Sept. 2015 because she could not afford an exterminator. She also said she had brought Stoner to the doctor in January 2016 because she had been sick and scratching her neck, but didn’t bring her back because she didn’t think Stoner’s condition had changed. Police, however, said it was “clearly visible and obvious” that Stoner needed serious medical help. Butler faces a felony neglect charge and a misdemeanor charge of involuntary manslaughter. (Chemicals are failing us in the fight against bedbugs.)

Link:
Caretaker Charged in Woman’s Bedbug Death – Newser – Newser

Posted in Bed Bug News | Comments Off on Caretaker Charged in Woman’s Bedbug Death – Newser – Newser

Hanover-area caretaker charged in bed bug death – York Daily Record/Sunday News

Posted: at 8:51 pm

West Manheim Township Police say a 96-year-old woman died as a result of “complications of sepsis following a bed bug infestation” at this home on Baltimore Pike, seen on Saturday, Feb. 25, 2017.(Photo: Lindsey Welling/ The Evening Sun)Buy Photo

Last February, West Manheim Township Police entered a home on Baltimore Pike and one of the first things they noticed were the bed bugs.

The pests were seen on walls and along ledges. They scurried on the bed sheets andpillow where an elderly woman slept in a first floor room. That woman, police said, told officers she was blind, but could “feel them crawling.”

Sometimes, she said, the bugs bit her, too.

EMS would later check on that woman, but did not notice any visible injuries, police said.

But, according to police, there was a second woman who was living at the home, too. Both had been staying there under the care of the home’s owner, Deborah Butler, who had previously run a licensed home care facility, Luckenbaugh Personal Care Home.

Butler, 72, closed that business a few years ago, and the women had stayed with her at her own home, police said. Butler provided food, shelter, clothing as well as personal and health care. Both women paid for the care services, documents state.

Two weeks after police visited Butler’s house for the first time, that second woman, Mary Stoner, 96, died at York Hospital. An autopsy determined that her cause of death was from “complications of sepsis following a bed bug infestation,” according to charging documents.

Despite lawsuits, police chief remains on duty

Felony charges were filed against Butler earlier this week. She faces neglect of care, a first-degree felony, as well as involuntary manslaughter, a misdemeanor.

According to police, Stoner was brought to the emergency room at York Hospital on Feb. 6, 2016. She had sores on her skin and staff there was under the opinion that Stoner’s infection was a result of bed bug bites, police said.

Stoner’s family moved her out of Butler’s home on Feb. 3 after noticing her health worsen. During previous visits, family told police Stoner was in good health.

Stoner was discharged from the hospital about a week later, only to be readmitted again. Doctors said she had pneumonia.

A week later she died.

In talking with police prior to Stoner’s death, Butler told them she had been trying to get rid of the bed bugs since September 2015 and had used store-bought supplies. She said she could not afford an exterminator and blamed Stoner for bringing in the bugs, documents state.

Gettysburg man killed in crash in borough Tuesday night

Butler had taken Stoner to her family doctor in January because Stoner had been scratching her neck and been sick. Butler did not mention bed bugs during the doctor’s appointment, police said, and Stoner didn’t mention them either.

In the coming weeks, Butler said she noticed no change in Stoner’s condition. But police said “evidence later indicated that the victim’s condition would have been clearly visible and obvious that serious medical attention was required.”

Stoner received no further medical treatment until her family took her to York Hospital in February.

In the week after Stoner’s death, police executed a search warrant of Butler’s home. York County Forensic Team collected evidence and photographed the home, documents state.

Bed bugs were seen in various stages of their life cycle, police wrote in charging documents.

Butler appeared for a preliminary arraignment on Thursday before District Judge James S. Miner. Unsecured bail was set at $50,000, meaning she was free to go. A preliminary hearing has been scheduled March 9.

Attempts to reach Butler were unsuccessful Friday night.

Pennsylvania Department of Human Services annual reports on personal care homes show no violations at Luckenbaugh Personal Care Home between 2008-2011, the only years for which reports that list individual homes’ violations are online.

Read or Share this story: http://evesun.co/2mgJHSY

Go here to read the rest:
Hanover-area caretaker charged in bed bug death – York Daily Record/Sunday News

Posted in Bed Bug News | Comments Off on Hanover-area caretaker charged in bed bug death – York Daily Record/Sunday News

Bedbugs kill woman, caretaker faces charges – USA TODAY

Posted: at 7:41 am

USA Today Network Gordon Rago, York (Pa.) Daily Record 3:40 p.m. ET Feb. 25, 2017

West Manheim Township Police say a 96-year-old woman died as a result of “complications of sepsis following a bed bug infestation” at this home on Baltimore Pike, seen on Saturday, Feb. 25, 2017.(Photo: Lindsey Welling/ The Evening Sun)

A Pennsylvania woman died last year from bedbug bite complications. The insects had invaded the care facility where she was housed.

Now, the woman’s 72-year-old caretaker Deborah Butler faces felony chargesincluding involuntary manslaughter and neglect of care.

Last February, West Manheim Township Police entered the southern Pennsylvania homeandnoticed the bed bugs. They crawled on walls and along ledges. Theyscurried on the bed sheets andpillow where an elderly woman slept in a first-floor room. She told officers she was blind, but could “feel them crawling.” Sometimes, she added, they bit her, too.

Paramedics, police said, would later check on that woman, but did not notice any visible injuries. Police said another woman, 96-year-old Mary Stoner,was staying at the home. Two weeks after the visit, Stoner was dead.

An autopsy determined her cause of death was from “complications of sepsis followed by bed bug infestation,” according to charging documents.

Is your city crawling with bed bugs?

Stoner’s familymoved her out of Butler’s home on Feb. 3, 2016,after noticing her health worsen. During previous visits, Stoner’s familytold police she was in good health. On Feb. 6, Stoner was brought to the emergency room, where doctors found sores on her skin. Staffmembers wereunder the opinion the woman’sinfection was a result of bed bug bites.

Stoner was discharged from the hospital about a week later, only to be readmitted again. Doctors said she had pneumonia.

She died aweek later.

The women, police said, stayed with Butler at herhome. Butler provided food, shelter, clothing as well as personal and health care. Both women paid for the care services, documents state.

The site of the former Luckenbaugh Personal Care Home in the 2000 block of Baltimore Pike, Saturday, Feb. 25, 2017.(Photo: Lindsey Welling/ The Evening Sun)

.

In talking with police prior to Stoner’s death, Butler told them she had been trying to get rid of the bed bugs since September 2015 and had used store-bought supplies. She said she could not afford an exterminator and blamed Stoner for bringing in the bugs, documents state.

Mich. state workers dealing with bedbugs at the office

Butler,who was charged last week, had taken Stoner to her family doctor in January because Stoner had been scratching her neck and been sick. Butler did not mention bed bugs during the doctor’s appointment, police said, and Stoner didn’t mention them either.

In the coming weeks, Butler said she noticed no change in Stoner’s condition. But police said “evidence later indicated that the victim’s condition would have been clearly visible and obvious that serious medical attention was required.”

Stoner received no further medical treatment until her family took her to York Hospital. In the week after Stoner’s death, police said they searched Butler’s home and found bed bugs in various stages of their life cycle.

Read or Share this story: http://usat.ly/2mpAF2N

Visit link:
Bedbugs kill woman, caretaker faces charges – USA TODAY

Posted in Bed Bugs | Comments Off on Bedbugs kill woman, caretaker faces charges – USA TODAY

Bedbugs | American Academy of Dermatology

Posted: February 25, 2017 at 2:44 am

Bedbug bites: When bedbugs bite, you often see clusters of bites. Each cluster usually contains 3 to 5 bites that appear in a zigzag pattern. How do you know if you have bedbugs?

To find out if you have bedbugs, you need to look for two things:

Bites on your body: If you have bedbugs, youre likely to have bites. Bedbug bites usually cause itchy welts. These welts usually appear in a zigzag pattern as show in the photo above.

Youll seldom see bedbugs, so many people mistakenly believe that mosquitos, fleas, or spiders bit them. Sometimes people mistake bedbug bites for a common skin condition such as an itchy rash, hives, or chickenpox.

To make sure you have bedbugs, youll need to look for signs of bedbugs.

Although bedbugs dont usually require serious medical attention, they can cause a great deal of anxiety and restless nights. To help find bedbugs before they find you (and your belongings), dermatologists recommend looking for the following signs near places where you sleep.

Signs of bedbugs: This step is important. If you have a bedbug infestation, you need to find out so that you can get rid of the bedbugs. Getting rid of the bedbugs is the only way to stop the bites.

If you have a large number of bedbugs, you may see the bugs. Most people, however, only see signs of bedbugs. To look for signs of bedbugs, check the places that people sleep for the following:

If you see bedbugs, they will likely scurry toward the closest hiding place. Any dark place such as inside a mattress or even a picture frame makes a good hiding place.

As you watch bedbugs move, it can look like they are flying or jumping because they can crawl quickly. Bedbugs cannot fly or jump; they can only crawl.

If you find signs of bedbugs, call a pest-control company or your property manager. You should not use bug spray or a fogger. These products have little effect on bedbugs.

You should see a dermatologist for treatment if you have:

Your dermatologist may prescribe the following to treat bedbug bites:

Allergic reaction: Some people may require an injection of an antihistamine, corticosteroid, or epinephrine (adrenaline) for a severe allergic reaction.

Infection: An infection may require an antibiotic. If the infection is mild, your dermatologist may recommend an antiseptic medication that you can buy without a prescription. Your dermatologist will tell you which one to use. Your dermatologist also may recommend an antiseptic to prevent a skin infection.

Itch: A prescription antihistamine pill or liquid can help. You also can apply a corticosteroid to the bites. Your dermatologist will tell you which is best for you.

If you do not have any signs of an infection or a serious reaction, you can often treat the bites at home.

To treat bedbug bites:

Bedbug bites usually heal and go away within a week or two.

Read the original:
Bedbugs | American Academy of Dermatology

Posted in Bed Bugs | Comments Off on Bedbugs | American Academy of Dermatology

Hanover-area caretaker charged in bed bug death – The Evening Sun – The Evening Sun

Posted: at 2:44 am

A stock image of a police officer.(Photo: Getty Images/iStockphoto)

Last February, West Manheim Township Police entered a home on Baltimore Pike and one of the first things they noticed were the bed bugs.

The pests were seen on walls and along ledges. They scurried on the bed sheets andpillow where an elderly woman slept in a first floor room. That woman, police said, told officers she was blind, but could “feel them crawling.”

Sometimes, she said, the bugs bit her, too.

EMS would later check on that woman, but did not notice any visible injuries, police said.

But, according to police, there was a second woman who was living at the home, too. Both had been staying there under the care of the home’s owner, Deborah Butler, who had previously run a licensed home care facility.

Butler, 72, closed that business, Luckenbaugh Personal Care Home, a few years ago, and the women had stayed with her at her own home, police said. Butler provided food, shelter, clothing as well as personal and health care. Both women paid for the care services, documents state.

Two weeks after police visited Butler’s house for the first time, that second woman, Mary Stoner, 96, died at York Hospital. An autopsy determined that her cause of death was from “complications of sepsis followed by bed bug infestation,” according to charging documents.

Despite lawsuits, police chief remains on duty

Felony charges were filed against Butler earlier this week. She faces neglect of care, a first-degree felony, as well as involuntary manslaughter, a misdemeanor.

According to police, Stoner was brought to the emergency room at York Hospital on Feb. 6, 2016. She had sores on her skin and staff there was under the opinion that Stoner’s infection was a result of bed bug bites, police said.

Stoner’s family moved her out of Butler’s home on Feb. 3 after noticing her health worsen. During previous visits, family told police Stoner was in good health.

Stoner was discharged from the hospital about a week later, only to be readmitted again. Doctors said she had pneumonia.

A week later she died.

In talking with police prior to Stoner’s death, Butler told them she had been trying to get rid of the bed bugs since September 2015 and had used store-bought supplies. She said she could not afford an exterminator and blamed Stoner for bringing in the bugs, documents state.

Gettysburg man killed in crash in borough Tuesday night

Butler had taken Stoner to her family doctor in January because Stoner had been scratching her neck and been sick. Butler did not mention bed bugs during the doctor’s appointment, police said, and Stoner didn’t mention them either.

In the coming weeks, Butler said she noticed no change in Stoner’s condition. But police said “evidence later indicated that the victim’s condition would have been clearly visible and obvious that serious medical attention was required.”

Stoner received no further medical treatment until her family took her to York Hospital in February.

In the week after Stoner’s death, police executed a search warrant of Butler’s home. York County Forensic Team collected evidence and photographed the home, documents state.

Bed bugs were seen in various stages of their life cycle, police wrote in charging documents.

Butler appeared for a preliminary arraignment on Thursday before District Judge James S. Miner. Unsecured bail was set at $50,000, meaning she was free to go. A preliminary hearing has been scheduled March 9. Attempts to reach Butler were unsuccessful Friday night.

Read or Share this story: http://evesun.co/2mgJHSY

See the original post here:
Hanover-area caretaker charged in bed bug death – The Evening Sun – The Evening Sun

Posted in Bed Bugs | Comments Off on Hanover-area caretaker charged in bed bug death – The Evening Sun – The Evening Sun

Page 11234..1020..»