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Bedbugs kill woman, caretaker faces charges – USA TODAY

Posted: February 26, 2017 at 7:41 am

USA Today Network Gordon Rago, York (Pa.) Daily Record 3:40 p.m. ET Feb. 25, 2017

West Manheim Township Police say a 96-year-old woman died as a result of “complications of sepsis following a bed bug infestation” at this home on Baltimore Pike, seen on Saturday, Feb. 25, 2017.(Photo: Lindsey Welling/ The Evening Sun)

A Pennsylvania woman died last year from bedbug bite complications. The insects had invaded the care facility where she was housed.

Now, the woman’s 72-year-old caretaker Deborah Butler faces felony chargesincluding involuntary manslaughter and neglect of care.

Last February, West Manheim Township Police entered the southern Pennsylvania homeandnoticed the bed bugs. They crawled on walls and along ledges. Theyscurried on the bed sheets andpillow where an elderly woman slept in a first-floor room. She told officers she was blind, but could “feel them crawling.” Sometimes, she added, they bit her, too.

Paramedics, police said, would later check on that woman, but did not notice any visible injuries. Police said another woman, 96-year-old Mary Stoner,was staying at the home. Two weeks after the visit, Stoner was dead.

An autopsy determined her cause of death was from “complications of sepsis followed by bed bug infestation,” according to charging documents.

Is your city crawling with bed bugs?

Stoner’s familymoved her out of Butler’s home on Feb. 3, 2016,after noticing her health worsen. During previous visits, Stoner’s familytold police she was in good health. On Feb. 6, Stoner was brought to the emergency room, where doctors found sores on her skin. Staffmembers wereunder the opinion the woman’sinfection was a result of bed bug bites.

Stoner was discharged from the hospital about a week later, only to be readmitted again. Doctors said she had pneumonia.

She died aweek later.

The women, police said, stayed with Butler at herhome. Butler provided food, shelter, clothing as well as personal and health care. Both women paid for the care services, documents state.

The site of the former Luckenbaugh Personal Care Home in the 2000 block of Baltimore Pike, Saturday, Feb. 25, 2017.(Photo: Lindsey Welling/ The Evening Sun)

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In talking with police prior to Stoner’s death, Butler told them she had been trying to get rid of the bed bugs since September 2015 and had used store-bought supplies. She said she could not afford an exterminator and blamed Stoner for bringing in the bugs, documents state.

Mich. state workers dealing with bedbugs at the office

Butler,who was charged last week, had taken Stoner to her family doctor in January because Stoner had been scratching her neck and been sick. Butler did not mention bed bugs during the doctor’s appointment, police said, and Stoner didn’t mention them either.

In the coming weeks, Butler said she noticed no change in Stoner’s condition. But police said “evidence later indicated that the victim’s condition would have been clearly visible and obvious that serious medical attention was required.”

Stoner received no further medical treatment until her family took her to York Hospital. In the week after Stoner’s death, police said they searched Butler’s home and found bed bugs in various stages of their life cycle.

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Bedbugs | American Academy of Dermatology

Posted: February 25, 2017 at 2:44 am

Bedbug bites: When bedbugs bite, you often see clusters of bites. Each cluster usually contains 3 to 5 bites that appear in a zigzag pattern. How do you know if you have bedbugs?

To find out if you have bedbugs, you need to look for two things:

Bites on your body: If you have bedbugs, youre likely to have bites. Bedbug bites usually cause itchy welts. These welts usually appear in a zigzag pattern as show in the photo above.

Youll seldom see bedbugs, so many people mistakenly believe that mosquitos, fleas, or spiders bit them. Sometimes people mistake bedbug bites for a common skin condition such as an itchy rash, hives, or chickenpox.

To make sure you have bedbugs, youll need to look for signs of bedbugs.

Although bedbugs dont usually require serious medical attention, they can cause a great deal of anxiety and restless nights. To help find bedbugs before they find you (and your belongings), dermatologists recommend looking for the following signs near places where you sleep.

Signs of bedbugs: This step is important. If you have a bedbug infestation, you need to find out so that you can get rid of the bedbugs. Getting rid of the bedbugs is the only way to stop the bites.

If you have a large number of bedbugs, you may see the bugs. Most people, however, only see signs of bedbugs. To look for signs of bedbugs, check the places that people sleep for the following:

If you see bedbugs, they will likely scurry toward the closest hiding place. Any dark place such as inside a mattress or even a picture frame makes a good hiding place.

As you watch bedbugs move, it can look like they are flying or jumping because they can crawl quickly. Bedbugs cannot fly or jump; they can only crawl.

If you find signs of bedbugs, call a pest-control company or your property manager. You should not use bug spray or a fogger. These products have little effect on bedbugs.

You should see a dermatologist for treatment if you have:

Your dermatologist may prescribe the following to treat bedbug bites:

Allergic reaction: Some people may require an injection of an antihistamine, corticosteroid, or epinephrine (adrenaline) for a severe allergic reaction.

Infection: An infection may require an antibiotic. If the infection is mild, your dermatologist may recommend an antiseptic medication that you can buy without a prescription. Your dermatologist will tell you which one to use. Your dermatologist also may recommend an antiseptic to prevent a skin infection.

Itch: A prescription antihistamine pill or liquid can help. You also can apply a corticosteroid to the bites. Your dermatologist will tell you which is best for you.

If you do not have any signs of an infection or a serious reaction, you can often treat the bites at home.

To treat bedbug bites:

Bedbug bites usually heal and go away within a week or two.

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Hanover-area caretaker charged in bed bug death – The Evening Sun – The Evening Sun

Posted: at 2:44 am

A stock image of a police officer.(Photo: Getty Images/iStockphoto)

Last February, West Manheim Township Police entered a home on Baltimore Pike and one of the first things they noticed were the bed bugs.

The pests were seen on walls and along ledges. They scurried on the bed sheets andpillow where an elderly woman slept in a first floor room. That woman, police said, told officers she was blind, but could “feel them crawling.”

Sometimes, she said, the bugs bit her, too.

EMS would later check on that woman, but did not notice any visible injuries, police said.

But, according to police, there was a second woman who was living at the home, too. Both had been staying there under the care of the home’s owner, Deborah Butler, who had previously run a licensed home care facility.

Butler, 72, closed that business, Luckenbaugh Personal Care Home, a few years ago, and the women had stayed with her at her own home, police said. Butler provided food, shelter, clothing as well as personal and health care. Both women paid for the care services, documents state.

Two weeks after police visited Butler’s house for the first time, that second woman, Mary Stoner, 96, died at York Hospital. An autopsy determined that her cause of death was from “complications of sepsis followed by bed bug infestation,” according to charging documents.

Despite lawsuits, police chief remains on duty

Felony charges were filed against Butler earlier this week. She faces neglect of care, a first-degree felony, as well as involuntary manslaughter, a misdemeanor.

According to police, Stoner was brought to the emergency room at York Hospital on Feb. 6, 2016. She had sores on her skin and staff there was under the opinion that Stoner’s infection was a result of bed bug bites, police said.

Stoner’s family moved her out of Butler’s home on Feb. 3 after noticing her health worsen. During previous visits, family told police Stoner was in good health.

Stoner was discharged from the hospital about a week later, only to be readmitted again. Doctors said she had pneumonia.

A week later she died.

In talking with police prior to Stoner’s death, Butler told them she had been trying to get rid of the bed bugs since September 2015 and had used store-bought supplies. She said she could not afford an exterminator and blamed Stoner for bringing in the bugs, documents state.

Gettysburg man killed in crash in borough Tuesday night

Butler had taken Stoner to her family doctor in January because Stoner had been scratching her neck and been sick. Butler did not mention bed bugs during the doctor’s appointment, police said, and Stoner didn’t mention them either.

In the coming weeks, Butler said she noticed no change in Stoner’s condition. But police said “evidence later indicated that the victim’s condition would have been clearly visible and obvious that serious medical attention was required.”

Stoner received no further medical treatment until her family took her to York Hospital in February.

In the week after Stoner’s death, police executed a search warrant of Butler’s home. York County Forensic Team collected evidence and photographed the home, documents state.

Bed bugs were seen in various stages of their life cycle, police wrote in charging documents.

Butler appeared for a preliminary arraignment on Thursday before District Judge James S. Miner. Unsecured bail was set at $50,000, meaning she was free to go. A preliminary hearing has been scheduled March 9. Attempts to reach Butler were unsuccessful Friday night.

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Preview: Getting to the bottom Of BMHA’s bed bug problem – WGRZ.com

Posted: February 23, 2017 at 9:44 pm

It took a two-month effort (and a threat of possible legal action) for 2 On-Your-Side to get the Buffalo Municipal Housing Authority to release internal documents related to its persistent bed bug problem. Have a look at what it took to bring this story t

Steve Brown, WGRZ 4:23 PM. EST February 23, 2017

BUFFALO – BUFFALO, NY– On Monday, 2 On-Your-Side has another look at the bed bug problem in Buffalo’s public housing.

It wasn’t easy.

On the day we went to air with our original story back in October, a spokeswoman from Mayor Byron Brown’s office informed us that the Buffalo Municipal Housing Authority had bed bug complaints in almost all of its projects.

That was more than we knew of.

We had a handful of inspection reports from the US Department of Housing and Urban Development on just four BMHA properties. All of them listing various bed bug issues.

2 On-Your-Side asked for the information on bed bug reports on all of the city’s public housing projects.

BMHA responded by saying we’ve have to submit a request in writing. That triggered a two-month effort for us to get our hands on the agency’s records.

2 On-Your-Side ultimately prevailed. The attached video on this page is the story behind the story.

( 2017 WGRZ)

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Maintaining year-round vigilance against bed bugs – McKnight’s Long Term Care News

Posted: at 9:43 pm

Eric Braun

During the summer months, many industries become increasingly concerned with potential bed bug infestations. The uptick in travel in the U.S. during this time is a key driver for spreading infestations, as travelers frequently pick up and/or leave bed bugs behind during hotel stays. Those in the long-term care industry don’t have the luxury of this shortened exposure period.

Regular resident turnover throughout the year means there’s a persistent threat of bed bugs and/or their eggs hitchhiking in on their luggage and other personal belongings. In addition, the constant flow of visitors puts long-term care facilities at risk, as bugs and eggs can stow away on their clothing or personal items.

Knowing that long-term care facilities are vulnerable to bed bug infestations year-round, there are a few things to keep in mind that will help caregivers and other staff identify a potential problem before it spreads. It’s important to know that looking for bites on residents is not a reliable way to monitor for a bed bug problem. Some people will have no visible reaction, and for those who do develop a reaction, it’s not possible to distinguish bed bugs bites from the bites of other, more common insects.

There are several elements to look for that are strong indicators of a bed bug infestation. These signs can be found on mattresses along the seams, tufts, and under tags; in box springs; on upholstered furniture and anywhere else people spend an extended period of time sleeping or sedentary. The best indicators of bed bugs include:

Fecal spotting Bed bug droppings resemble markings from a fine-tipped marker and can be observed as spots or streaks on fabric surfaces. Less commonly, the digested blood left behind by bed bugs can bead up and dry into small specs on hard surfaces. Fecal spotting is the most prevalent and easiest sign to observe.

The bugs themselves Adult bed bugs are approximately 5mm long, similar in size to an apple seed. Bed bug nymphs vary in size and are usually pale tan in color. Sometimes a deep red spot can be observed in the gut of bugs that have recently fed.

Cast skins As bed bugs progress through their life stages, they shed their skins and leave them behind in areas where an infestation is present. These skins range in color from tan to brown and may look like small insect shells.

Blood spots Extended or chronic contact with bed bugs may cause tiny spots of blood on bedding or on furniture where a resident spends time sleeping. Bed bug bites are slow to scab because the bugs inject an anticoagulant when they bite. This can cause tiny droplets of blood to form on the surface of the skin after feeding has completed and the insect has returned to its hiding place.

While education and being able to identify the signs described above are helpful ways for staff members at long-term care facilities to remain vigilant, the best practice for keeping bed bug infestations at bay is through regular inspections performed by a trained professional. A professional with a bright flashlight is capable of spotting signs of infestation that an untrained eye is likely to miss. Pest management professionals can even utilize specially trained dogs to sniff out live bugs and viable eggs in places that are difficult to inspect visually. This is especially efficient for large facilities, as a canine team trained to identify bed bugs can inspect room-by-room much faster than even the most experienced human.

If staff members do observe signs and suspect a bed bug infestation, it’s important to bring in a trained professional as soon as possible; self-treating is not an effective or recommended course of action. Applying insecticides containing repellents probably won’t kill all the bugs, and may force any surviving bugs into atypical locations, making them more difficult to find and treat.

If a facility identifies an infestation in a piece of furniture, it’s imperative that the staff does not compound the problem by moving these infested items to another room. Moving contaminated items can spread infestations via bugs and eggs hiding or contained within. If staff does believe it’s necessary to dispose of furniture or personal items that show signs of an infestation, the best protocol is to wrap those items in plastic or place them in an industrial trash bag, prior to removing them from their original location.

Pest management professionals can use a variety of techniques to treat a bed bug infestation, ranging from insecticides to less disruptive methods. The use of heat to control bed bugs has been recently adopted by the pest management industry, has been shown to be highly effective at killing all life stages of bed bugs, and is now recognized as one of the most effective treatment solutions available. Heat is used to treat bed bugs in many ways, such as in clothes dryers for clothes and bedding, steamers for upholstery and mattresses, and in the form of heat chambers and portable heaters for furnishings or entire rooms.

Heat treatments offer certain advantages when compared to conventional insecticide treatments. Heat is non-toxic and kills all bed bug life stages, including eggs. Heat can penetrate even the tiniest bed bug hiding places, (ones that are easily overlooked during conventional treatments), and also treats fabrics and upholstery where insecticides cannot be applied. Heat alone has no long-lasting, residual activity, which means bed bugs can re-infest the item or area following the treatment. Still, when done properly and carefully, heat can eliminate a bed bug infestation in one treatment, and a professional can conduct a follow-up inspection to make sure the infestation has been fully eliminated.

While bed bugs have made a strong comeback in recent years, infestations are uncommon in most areas. Still, due to the difficulty and cost associated with treating, constant vigilance is important. Identifying the signs of an infestation early and bringing in professional help before the problem becomes widespread will minimize the headache involved in dealing with this troublesome pest.

Eric Braun is a board-certified entomologist and the manager for Rentokil Steritech’s bed bug line of business. He is an expert in detecting and treating bed bugs in residential and commercial settings.

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Campus resources for bed bug detection – CU Boulder Today

Posted: at 9:43 pm

CU Boulder Facilities Management and Environmental Health and Safety staff this month have treated one classroom in the Fleming Law building and one in Koelbel Building for the possible presence of bed bugs.

These events present an opportunity for the campus to not only create awareness around an issue that has in recent years become an increasing problem for universities and other facilities across the country but also to inform students and employees about treatment methods CU Boulder uses and available resources for mitigating against the insects.

No bugs, dead or alive, have been found in Fleming 155 or Koelbel S135. However, inspections of the rooms led scent-detection dogs to alert their handlers to the possible presence of live forms of the bugs, which could include eggs, in three areas of Fleming 155 and in one wall-mounted television in Koelbel S135. Those rooms were both closed and underwent thermal treatments. Follow-up inspections by the canines confirmed no further presence of any live forms of the bugs, and the rooms were deemed safe and re-opened.

The thermal treatment CU Boulder uses is a non-pesticide treatment proven to be the only method that effectively kills all forms of bed bugs (adults, juveniles and eggs). The treatment involves heating an area to 130 degrees Fahrenheit for several hours. There are no chemical residues left behind that could lead to skin irritations or other adverse effects. The rooms are safe to re-enter once temperatures have returned to normal. CU Boulder, however, does not re-open affected rooms until follow-up inspections confirm that treatments were successful.

If bed bugs are found on campus

Facilities Management plans to conduct periodic follow-up inspections of the affected rooms in Fleming and Koelbel to ensure the insects have not been reintroduced. However, it is important to note community awareness also plays a key role in helping to identify the source of insects and prevent reintroduction.

Anyone who frequents Fleming 155 or Koelbel S135 is encouraged to be on the lookout for bed bugs both at work and at home. Providing this information to Facilities Management can prove invaluable in more effectively preventing reintroduction to campus, as staff can consult on mitigation strategies with anyone who discovers bed bugs at home.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, bed bugs can be found around the world, and their presence is not determined by the cleanliness of the living conditions where they are found. Bed bugs are not known to spread disease, although their bites can cause allergic reactions.

The university encourages anyone who notices or suspects bed bugs in an office, classroom, residence hall, family housing apartment or anywhere else to notify Facilities Management as soon as possible. Ed von Bleichert is CU Boulders sustainability and resiliency program manager and can be reached at 303-735-3627 or edward.vonbleichert@colorado.edu.

Additionally, issues can be reported to the Facilities Management Operations Control Center 24 hours per day at 303-492-5522. If you live in on-campus housing, Housing and Dining Services also has its own Facilities Operations Center that can be reached at 303-735-5555.

The university provides free pest-control services to campus departments, and von Bleichert can also advise students and employees on how to deal with the bugs if they spread to their homes.

Visit the The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website for a comprehensive guide to bed bugs.

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Bed bug treatment displaces some residents – The Killeen Daily Herald

Posted: at 12:45 am

Some tenants at Bradley Arms Apartments in downtown Killeen are complaining that the apartment managements effort to rid the complex of bed bugs is causing hardships on families who live there.

We have to sit out here for 12 hours, said Emma Jones, 39, who lives in the apartment complex on North Eighth Street with her three children, ages 12, 13 and 19.

Jones said the management company Isbell Property Management gave tenants about a weeks notice before the pest control action began, but the mother and her children had nowhere to go.

Property manager Josh Isbell said Wednesday tenants were informed several weeks before the process began so that they could choose to have their apartments sprayed or not for bed bugs. Isbell also said management went out to the properties to talk with tenants and tell them what would be required of them if they opted for the service.

This procedure was entirely optional, he said. The majority of the properties werent affected, and the ones that were, were mostly vacant, and we just decided to offer it to all of our properties.

Isbell said the spraying began about 1 p.m. each time they sprayed, and tenants were allowed to go back to their apartments after the close of business.

Jones said her concern was she had to stay outside with her property to protect it.

The thing is, I dont know anybody here, she said Tuesday as she waited outside.

Jones said she is disabled, on a fixed income and cant afford a hotel room for a day.

She and her children also had to remove all of her furniture and her belongings from the apartment. The kids missed a day of school because of it, and the family had to stay in the apartments parking lot all day to keep watch over their belongings.

Jones said the apartment should have provided a storage area for tenants to store their belongings while the apartments were being treated.

For tenants that opted to have their properties sprayed, removing the furniture from the apartment was recommended but not required, Isbell said. Because of that, no storage area for furniture was provided because it wasnt required that it be removed.”

Jones said her particular apartment did not have bed bugs, but another did, causing the management to spray for the hard-to-kill insect in all of the apartments, which they are doing over the course of days or more.

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Bed bugs back at Westgate Apartments in Stroudsburg – Pocono Record

Posted: at 12:45 am

Monroe County Housing Authority says its a chronic condition.

The Westgate apartments have gone through another series of treatments after a rash of bed bugs were found in about a dozen units, management said.

Employees of pest control company Orkin were at the Stroudsburg Main Street apartment building Tuesday afternoon to complete a two-step treatment of bed bugs found in a dozen units with another few neighboring units also receiving treatment, Monroe County Housing Authority executive director Rich Widdoss said.

Tenants at the 99-unit apartment complex were informed of the infestation and plans to exterminate it by an Orkin representative, Widdoss said. Due to chemical use, tenants in affected areas were required to leave the complex for a few hours and remove their clothing from the units in order to wash and dry them. It was the second of two treatments by Orkin, Widdoss said the first occurring about a week and a half ago.

The public housing project has had recurring issues with bed bugs in the past, with Widdoss describing it as a chronic condition. The housing authority only recently contracted Orkin for a re-evaluation, having used several different contractors for pest control in past years, deputy executive director Linda Kaufman said.

Despite recurring bed bug reports, Westgate has remained housed at full capacity, Kaufman said, with no closures of floors or units for treatment. Widdoss was informed by Orkin that local hotels have had a far worse faring with bed bugs in past years, but hotels are able to treat the issue between room reservations.

Kaufman described bed bugs as aproblem every landlord has to address.

It can come and go, when people leave and move in, Kaufman said. Or it’s something as simple as people going on vacation and it coming back with them.

Outside visitors could easily carry the pests into apartment units, Widdoss said. He recalled a tenant who, after giving frequent car rides to others, had to have the inside of their vehicle treated for infestation last year.

Westgate benefits from a mostly concrete framework that usually limits bed bugs to one unit. Though units are checked for pests on an as-needed basis as opposed to a set schedule the public housing staff is trained to look for infestation and keep an ear to tenants.

Some tenants being treated for bed bugs this week have had multiple infestations before, Widdoss said.

They want it resolved, but theyve got to be the ones to follow protocol, Widdoss said.

Kaufman reiterated that tenants should inform their landlords of any bed bugs or cockroaches immediately, before the problem worsens.

We do treat every issue in a timely manner, and well say that if a tenant does not help in this situation, it may jeopardize their housing, Kaufman said.

No tenants housing situation was affected by the most recent treatment, Kaufman said.

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Chicago transit passenger says he found bed bug-filled bag on train … – Fox News

Posted: February 21, 2017 at 9:47 pm

If you use public transportation in Chicago, you might want to avoid the Red Line for a while.

A Chicago transit rider named Michael Moore (no, not that one) recently spotted hundreds and hundreds of tiny insects which he believes were bed bugs in a fellow passengers bag.

THE BEST WAY TO SEARCH A HOTEL FOR BED BUGS

Moore was riding on a downtown-bound train when he noticed the insects inside a nearby garbage bag, which was brought on-board by a homeless woman, he alleges. Moore then notified the conductor, but not before capturing about 12 seconds of footage of the bugs as they crawled across the womans belongings.

Moore told WLS News that once the trains crew had become aware of the problem, they evacuated all the passengers from his car.

They evacuate just that car from the train, and then we stop there for about 10 minutes and they clean the train, he told WLS.

Once the crew was done cleaning, Moore boarded another train car to continue on his way but so did the woman, still carrying the bug-filled bag, says Moore.

“It has holes in the bottom of the bag, and then she gets onto another train,” he remarked.

Moore adds that he and the woman boarded separate train cars upon re-entering the Red Line.

WLS reports that the Chicago Transit Authority didnt confirm whether the insects were actually bed bugs, but they did say they dont prevent paying customers from entering their trains.

Sleep tight, Chicago.

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VIDEO: Woman Carrying Bag Infested With Bugs On CTA Red Line – CBS Local

Posted: at 9:47 pm

February 21, 2017 11:48 AM

CHICAGO (CBS) The CTA is trying to eliminating some El riders who do not pay and are unwanted by other passengers.

Those nonpaying El riders are bugs. WBBMs Bernie Tafoya reports.

A CTA Red Line rider posted a video on YouTube showing bugs flat, beige bugs perhaps, baby bed bugs on clothing inside the bag of a woman, who was sleeping on the train.

The incident occurred Friday around 2:30 p.m. on the Red Line.

The video taker, Michael Moore told the conductor, who then had a cleaning crew go over the El car. The train was evacuated while a cleaning crew disinfected the car. But what concerned Moore was the woman carrying the bag containing the bugs, waited with everyone else and reentered the train on another car.

The car where the bugs were originally found was taken out of service.

CTA told WBBM, When the CTA received a report of pests on a Red Line train at Roosevelt on Friday, the rail car was immediately removed from service as a precautionary measure and received preventative treatment by an exterminator. At this time, there is no confirmation that the pests depicted on the video are bed bugs.

In September, another Red Line train was removed from service after a rider said he spotted more than 30 small, white bugs crawling around a row of six seats.

RELATED: CTA Red Line Train Removed For Cleaning After Rider Finds Bugs

The CTA released a statement saying, While providing more than 700,000 rail rides each day, CTA takes reported incidents of uncleanliness, including those regarding pests, very seriously. We have a rigorous process to maintain cleanliness on our system and our bus and trains are cleaned daily, both before and after each trip, and at the end of each day. Vehicles also receive thorough, deep cleanings on a regular basis that includes preventative treatment for pests.

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